2020 Impact factor 3.911

EPJ C: New Editor-in-Chief for Experimental Physics II: Astroparticle Physics

The publishers of The European Physical Journal C – Particles and Fields are pleased to announce the appointment of Professor Laura Baudis as new Editor-in-Chief. This follows the splitting of the experimental section into Experimental Physics I: Accelerator Based High-Energy Physics, now led by Jos Engelen, and Experimental Physics II: Astroparticle Physics, now led by Laura Baudis.

Laura Baudis is a Professor at the University of Zurich. Her research interests are in astroparticle physics and cosmology, in particular in the fields of direct dark matter detection and neutrino physics.

EPJ C Highlight - Bright sparks shed new light on the dark matter riddle

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Data gathered by the detector module Lise depicted in the light yield energy plane.

Highest sensitivity detector ever used for very light dark matter elementary particles

The origin of matter in the universe has puzzled physicists for generations. Today, we know that matter only accounts for 5% of our universe; another 25% is constituted of dark matter. And the remaining 70% is made up of dark energy. Dark matter itself represents an unsolved riddle.

Physicists believe that such dark matter is composed of (as yet undefined) elementary particles that stick together thanks to gravitational force. In a study recently published in EPJ C, scientists from the CRESST-II research project use the so-called phonon-light technique to detect dark matter. They are the first to use a detection probe that operates with such a low trigger threshold, which yields suitable sensitivity levels to uncover the as-yet elusive particles responsible for dark matter.

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EPJ C Highlight - Shedding new light on dark matter

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Light yield versus energy of events passing all selection criteria. © G. Angloher and et al.

Study shows significant progress in determining what dark matter is not made of, thanks to much more sensitive detectors capable of identifying the presence of elusive particles, called WIMPs

According to astronomical observations, dark matter constitutes a five times greater proportion of the universe than ordinary matter, which only makes up 5% of the matter in the universe. The remaining 70% of the universe is known as dark energy. However, we still do not know what dark matter is made of. Indeed, none of the known elementary particles fulfil the criteria to explain dark matter. One theory suggests that it consists of as yet unknown elementary particles that interact only very weakly with ordinary matter, fittingly called WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles). Now, members of the CRESST (Cryogenic Rare Event Search with Superconducting Thermometers) collaboration have analysed recent data showing what dark matter is not made of, from a new kind of detector for such particles. This work has recently been published in EPJ C.

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EPJ C goes Open Access funded by SCOAP3

As of January 2014, The European Physical Journal C – Particles and Fields will be published as full open access journal funded by SCOAP3. One of the leading journals in the field, EPJ C was selected to participate in this initiative - lead by CERN with the support of partners in 24 countries - which will make a vast fraction of scientific articles in the field of High-Energy Physics open access at no cost for any author. Moreover authors will retain copyright and creative commons licenses will enable wide re-use of the published material.

EPJ C Highlight - Removing complexity layers from the universe’s creation

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A schematic depiction of the combined motion that a Brownian particle executes in a background polycrystalline space. © The authors

Understanding complexity in the early universe may require combining simpler models to interpret cosmological observations

Complicated statistical behaviour observed in complex systems such as early universe can often be understood if it is broken down into simpler ones. Two physicists, Petr Jizba (currently affiliated with the Czech Technical University in Prague), and Fabio Scardigli (now working at Kyoto University in Japan), have just published results in EPJ C pertaining to theoretical predictions of such cosmological systems’ dynamics.

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EPJ C Highlight - Curvature Oscillations in Modified Gravity Theories as Possible Source of Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays

The origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, with energies around the GZK cutoff, remains an unsolved mystery. In the present letter a novel and intriguing explanation is suggested that links far-reaching fundamental aspects of F(R) modified theories to an efficient production of highly energetic cosmic rays during the recent history of the Universe.

At the core of this work lies the proof that in cosmological and astrophysical systems with rising energy densities, the F(R) modified theories of gravity exhibit powerful oscillations of the curvature scalar R, with an amplitude much larger than the standard value of curvature predicted by the General Relativity. These oscillations are strongly anharmonic, with frequencies that can be as large as billions of GeV. This striking and rather unexpected oscillatory behavior of R lends support to the idea that ultra-high energy cosmic rays can be generated by such curvature oscillations at the appropriate cosmological redshifts.

Curvature oscillations in modified gravity and high energy cosmic rays. E.V. Arbuzova, A.D. Dolgov, L. Reverberi (2012), European Physical Journal C 72:2247, DOI 10.1140/epjc/s10052-012-2247-z

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EPJ C - Neutrons escaping to a parallel world?

An anomaly in the behaviour of ordinary particles may point to the existence of mirror particles that could be candidates for dark matter responsible for the missing mass of the universe. In a paper recently published in EPJC, researchers hypothesised the existence of mirror particles to explain the anomalous loss of neutrons observed experimentally. The existence of such mirror matter had been suggested in various scientific contexts some time ago, including the search for suitable dark matter candidates.

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EPJ C - "Spooky action at distance" in particle physics?!

Physicists have developed the first conclusive test to better understand high-energy particles correlations.

Researchers have devised a proposal for the first conclusive experimental test of a phenomenon known as "Bell’s nonlocality". This test is designed to reveal correlations that are stronger than any classical correlations, and do so between high-energy particles that do not consist of ordinary matter and light. These results are relevant to the so-called "CP violation" principle, which is used to explain the dominance of matter over antimatter. These findings by Beatrix Hiesmayr, a theoretical physicist at the University of Vienna, and her colleagues, a team of quantum information theory specialists, particle physicists and nuclear physicists, have been published in EPJC.

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EPJ C - New Theory Editors-in-Chief and Fermi Prize for Dieter Haidt

The publishers of The European Physical Journal C – Particles and Fields are pleased to announce the appointment of Professors Gino Isidori (Frascati) and Sergei Odintsov (Barcelona) as new theory Editors-in-Chief. This follows the splitting of the theory section into Theory I: Phenomenology of the Standard Model and Beyond, now led by Gino Isidori, and Theory II: Gravitation, Astroparticle Physics and Cosmology, General Aspects of Quantum Field Theories and Alternatives, now led by Sergei Odintsov.

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EPJ C - No sign of supersymmetry

Most stringent limits ever set by ATLAS

"Supersymmetry - to be or not to be?" remains a still unanswered question - it is a traditionally difficult business to demonstrate a zero result in experimental physics - yet the ATLAS collaboration has just set new and very stringent limitations on the "viability space" of a class of new physics models incorporating gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking.

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Editors-in-Chief
B. Fraboni and G. García López
The authors acknowledge the two anonymous reviewers for the constructive comments and suggestions which have helped to improve the manuscript significantly and thank the journal for the kind collaboration.

Sandra Morelli, Università di Modena, Italy

ISSN: 2190-5444 (Electronic Edition)

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Springer-Verlag